Infancy is marked by the search for balance.

After thousands of movement iterations, a young child finds a stable, upright position and takes her first step.

But whether it’s learning to walk, or performing in sport, the importance of preserving stability doesn’t change.

When Roger Federer lunges several steps forward to collect a rapidly falling drop shot, balance is essential. So too when, in mid-air, Lionel Messi strikes a bouncing ball into the top corner of the opposition’s net.

Moving with balance requires the manipulation of our centre of gravity.

By widening our base of support, the more balanced we become, and vice versa. It’s why children learn to stand up from a deep squatted position, not the other way around.

There are thousands of exercises to improve balance.  The important thing is not which one we pick, but that we challenge the orientation of the body over and over again.

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Craig’s passion is helping athletes become the best that they can be. In February 2014, Craig completed his PhD, with a focus on athlete development, at AUT University and has lead Athlete Development since 2010. In that time he has seen the programme grow from strength to strength.

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